History

Hi, I'm Daniel Gliebe. I created Tiger CAM back in 1997 when I was in 10th grade. It was a simple refresh cam. I used an old VHS camcorder and a tuner card to capture the frames. I ran ChillCam on my P150 web server to provide a whopping 1 frame per 5 seconds. Fellow students always joked that I was running a p0rn site. One of my teachers always joked that Tiger was in fact not a real cat but a rubber cat and I just had my mom turned it every couple hours to make it look like it was a real cat.

Well I assure you, Tiger is real. (And the fact that he's naked does not make it a porn site.) He's at a plump and ripe old age of approximately 14 years (Born approx April 1, 1991). He's one fat-ass cat too. You'll see for yourself if you get the chance to see him on one of the cameras.

Tiger CAM has matured over the years. I now use more advanced software which provides a much better frame rates. Tiger CAM was listed in the Camarades community, but but now I get all my traffic from work of mouth and search engines. I have over 30,000 hits on the Camarades page to date since they began their counter service. Before that I had a separate counter that got over 100,000 hits I believe.

Where's Tiger you ask? Normally you can find him in his bed on Line 1 in the garage. You can also check Line 7 on the front walk way in the afternoon. When it is wintertime and it gets colder he'll sleep in one cozy spot consistently, but when it is hot summer time it is harder to get him in front of a camera. You have to understand that here in Sunny San Diego, CA; we have hot summer conditions 90% of the year. LOL. Seriously though, if you want to see Tiger, try looking at Line 1 when it is nighttime here. We lock him in the garage at night to keep him safe from wild animals.

The Pan/Tilt Camera, Pan/Tilt controller and 8-Line video switcher are all homemade. When you click buttons on Tiger CAM, Panster responds by sending serial data out Com 1 to my Pan/Tilt controller box and the 8-Line video switcher box. These devices contain microcontrollers called a PIC. I custom programmed them to understand a simple serial protocol and control things like relays and servos. You will also notice that there is an OSD overlay that displays info about that video Line. That is a BOBII OSD Module, which is part of the Video Switcher. The LED sign is computer programmable and connects directly to Com 2.

I built and programmed all the hardware but I did not make the Panster or Shoutbox software. I suck at programming. So my Cousin, Mark, did all the software. Panster has the ability to listen on a TCP port for information and then send the appropriate data out the serial port to the video switcher or Pan/Tilt controller. Shoutbox works in a similar way, except it sends data to the LED sign instead. Both programs keep logs so I know when you people screw it up and who did it. LOL.

-Dan

*Wednesday, September 25, 2002
*Revised - Friday, June 10, 2005